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Jeffrey B. Putnam
telesign
Marina Del Rey, California
 

Jeffrey Putnam has spent (and misspent) his life quite happily in the pursuit of knowledge of all sorts. After getting an undergraduate degree in mathematics, he spent several years in the Peace Corps in Zaire learning to speak French with an atrocious accent, as well as getting on-the-job lessons in how to inflict math and physics on high school students. After returning to the US, he went to graduate school at the University at Albany, garnering two master's degrees along the way.

A real job eventually became inevitable, and he worked for the Computer Science Branch at General Electrics Research and Development Center and as the main programmer for a startup, before returning to student life at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for his PhD in electrical, systems and computer engineering. Since then, he has annoyed students and faculty alike at New Mexico Tech, designed systems and irritated marketers at yet another startup, and tried to serve as the faculty for a computer science program at Eastern Oregon University. He has now landed in Washington State, where he works for the computer science department at Eastern Washington University.

His professional interests range from evolutionary programming and artificial life to computer systems to programming languages (ask tomorrow and the list is likely to change). Nonprofessionally he has been known to enjoy randomly exploring things, including wandering extensively in the woods (sometimes as a wilderness search and rescue volunteer); climbing up and down hills, mountains, and rocks; and reading (though only rarely all at once).


     

The electronics revolution: inventing the future
Williams J.,  Springer International Publishing, New York, NY, 2017. 286 pp. Type: Book (978-3-319490-87-8)

It is likely that no technological change in the history of humanity has happened as quickly, as pervasively, and as drastically as the introduction of electronics. Only just over a hundred years ago, the electron was discovered. Since then, progr...

 

Workload characterization: a survey revisited
Calzarossa M., Massari L., Tessera D.  ACM Computing Surveys 48(3): 1-43, 2016. Type: Article

This paper considers the process of characterizing workloads in different kinds of computing services....

 

Calculus for cognitive scientists: derivatives, integrals and models
Peterson J.,  Springer International Publishing, New York, NY, 2016. 507 pp. Type: Book

We hear sometimes that most people don’t need to learn calculus, that other branches of mathematics are better choices. Statistics is often suggested, along with discrete mathematics for computer science students. We even hear that no one re...

 

Rolling out 5G: use cases, applications, and technology solutions
Badic B., Drewes C., Karls I., Mueck M.,  Apress, New York, NY, 2016. 138 pp. Type: Book (978-1-484215-07-4)

5G telephones! How long ago was 4G? 4G long-term evolution (LTE)? It was introduced about eight years ago--eons in technology years--and is still being deployed in many areas. It also continues to evolve. This book discusses both sides o...

 

Secure data deletion
Reardon J.,  Springer International Publishing, New York, NY, 2016. 203 pp. Type: Book (978-3-319287-77-5)

Securely deleting data is a problem in more than just the digital sphere--for example, we are encouraged to shred paper documents with sensitive information. But how secure is shredding? The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) r...

 
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