Computing Reviews
Today's Issue Hot Topics Search Browse Recommended My Account Log In
Home Topics Titles Quotes Blog Featured Help
Search
 
Anthony Joseph Duben
Stephen F. Austin State University
Nacogdoches, Texas
 

Duben is the Dean of the College of Sciences and Mathematics of the Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas. He took this position after he retired as professor emeritus of computer science from Southeast Missouri State University, where he spent 22 years, rising from assistant professor to professor, and serving as associate dean of the College of Science and Mathematics and as chairman of the computer science department.

He studied chemistry and mathematics for his BS from Marquette University in Milwaukee. His PhD, in physical chemistry, is from the Pennsylvania State University. He was, and is, particularly interested in computational chemistry. His early exposure to computing was on an IBM 7094 using Fortran II, and he completed his dissertation research on an IBM 360. At that time, he discovered that a person could make a lot of friends if he knew OS360 JCL.

His interest in computational chemistry took him from large quantum mechanical calculations into statistical mechanical studies of glycoprotein geometries, as well as into instrument construction and computerized data collection and control systems.

Although he is a full-time administrator, he is still interested in computational science. In particular, he wishes he had the time to use the new college parallel processing cluster to work on some unresolved problems in molecular hydrodynamics and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of proteins and sugars. He is also interested in Extensible Markup Language (XML) applications in the sciences for data storage and portability among computer programs.

He belongs to the ACM, IEEE, and IEEE-Computer Society, and served the profession as an ABET-CAC accreditation evaluator (and hopes to continue doing so).


     

 Computational artifacts: towards a philosophy of computer science
Turner R.,  Springer International Publishing, New York, NY, 2018. 255 pp. Type: Book (978-3-662555-64-4)

The philosophy of any discipline must account for the goals, methodology, and subject matter of the discipline [1]. There is a well-developed body of scholarship on the philosophy of mathematics and of science, especially physics and biology, and ...

 

Economic growth and automation risks in developing countries due to the transition toward digital modernity
Nagano A.  ICEGOV 2018 (Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance, Galway, Ireland,  Apr 4-6, 2018) 42-50, 2018. Type: Proceedings

When I read this paper, I recalled a news report from several months ago that describes a robot that can cut and sew fabric into garments. It is so sophisticated that it can handle patterned fabrics so that seams match and pockets are inconspicuou...

 

Beginning functional JavaScript: functional programming with JavaScript using ECMAScript 6
Aravinth A.,  Apress, New York, NY, 2017. 164 pp. Type: Book (978-1-484226-55-1)

Functional programming is a programming paradigm centered on the evaluation of mathematical functions and is a declarative language of expressions. Side effects are unacceptable. Whenever a function is evaluated given a set of inputs, the same res...

 

The geometrical beauty of plants
Gielis J.,  Springer International Publishing, New York, NY, 2017. 229 pp. Type: Book (978-9-462391-50-5)

The beauty and diversity of plants has interested botanists for centuries. Common features among plants (types of flowers, stem and branch patterns, leaf shapes and clustering, and shapes of plant organs) are all modified by variations between and...

 

Euclidean distance geometry: an introduction
Liberti L., Lavor C.,  Springer International Publishing, New York, NY, 2017. 133 pp. Type: Book (978-3-319607-91-7)

If someone has a set of objects whose positions are known, calculating the distances between them is not a problem. However, the inverse problem is difficult, that is, given a set of distances between objects, determine their positions. Unfortunat...

 
  more...

 
Send Your Comments
Contact Us
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.   Copyright © 2000-2019 ThinkLoud, Inc.
Terms of Use
| Privacy Policy